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Climate Monitor

Storing the sun

Storing the sun

The cost of installing solar photovoltaic (PV) panels on a home has fallen dramatically in recent years, even as government subsidies that supported and subsidised the technology have been wound back or eliminated. These falling costs have lead to a massive increase in the number of systems installed in Australia, from approximately 20,000 residential solar PV systems in 2008 to over one million today. Kinesis has been working with developers across Australia to identify energy efficiency and alternative energy opportunities that can reduce emissions and save households money. Since the recent price drops, solar PV has become one of the most cost effective energy technologies we have analysed (with an approximately 8 year payback period compared to 13 years for solar hot water). This edition of the Kinesis Climate Monitor examines the economics of solar PV and some of the ways in which households can maximise their financial savings.

Distributed Energy and the City

Distributed Energy and the City

Distributed energy opportunities have received plenty of attention in Australia recently as a way for cities to reduce their reliance on traditional, coal fired, electricity. Earlier this year Kinesis presented at the Alliance to Save Energy’s (A2SE) Second Sydney Summer Study. This conference focused on decentralised energy and energy efficiency and Kinesis presented some of the lessons learned from recent work – particularly the importance of diversified technological solutions. For example, we explained how the Decentralised Energy Master Plan we developed for the City of Sydney was as much an Energy Efficiency Master Plan as it was a Trigeneration Master Plan. This edition of the Kinesis Climate Monitor looks at recent trends in the uptake of distributed technology and highlights some of the key issues we presented at the conference.